Recommendations

Faculty of Pain Medicine, ANZCA

Recommendations from the Faculty of Pain Medicine, ANZCA on chronic pain, neuropathic pain and low back pain. The Faculty of Pain Medicine is a faculty of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and is the professional organisation for specialist pain medicine physicians (Fellows) and specialist pain medicine physicians in training (trainees). The Faculty is responsible for the training, examination and specialist accreditation of specialist pain medicine physicians and for the standards of clinical practice for pain medicine in Australia and New Zealand. Formed in 1998, the Faculty is the first multidisciplinary medical academy in the world to be devoted to education and training in pain medicine.

6.
Do not prescribe currently available medicinal cannabis products to treat chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) unless part of a registered clinical trial.

Date reviewed: 19 March 2021

Cannabis-derived products are now available for use with therapeutic intentions in Australia and New Zealand. By far the most common reason for their use is chronic pain however there is a critical lack of evidence that it provides a consistent benefit for any type of chronic non-cancer pain. More than 90% of Special Access Scheme – Category B (SAS-B) approvals have been for chronic pain of various types.

The evidence available is either unsupportive of using cannabinoid products in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP), or is of such low quality that no valid scientific conclusion can be drawn. Cannabidiol-only formulations have not been the subject of a published randomised controlled trial (RCT) for pain indications, yet they are the most commonly prescribed type of product.

In addition, evidence of harms does exist, particularly in relation to sedative effects, interactions with other medications and neuropsychiatric effects (for products which contain tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)).

Given the above, the clinical use of cannabinoid products cannot be ethically recommended outside a properly established and registered clinical trial environment until high-quality evidence for specific indications is published.

Supporting evidence
  • IASP Presidential Taskforce on Cannabis and Cannabinoid Analgesia Position Statement. PAIN: March 16, 2021 Special Edition
  • Fisher E., Moor A., Fogarty A., Finn D., et al. Cannabinoids, cannabis and cannabis-based medicine for pain management – a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. PAIN: May 18, 2020 Online ahead of print
  • Arnold J, Nation T, McGregor I Prescribing Medicinal Cannabis Aust Prescr 2020;43:152-9 1 October 2020
  • Stockings E, Campbell G, Hall W, Nielsen S, Zagic D, Rahman R, Murnion B, Farrell M, Weier M, Degenhardt L Cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of people with chronic noncancer pain conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled and observational studies PAIN 2018 Oct 159(10):1932-1954
  • https://www.iasp-pain.org/summarystatement
How this list was made How this list was made

Recommendation 1-5
The Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM), ANZCA established a working group to develop a preliminary list of pain medicine related practices that were identified, using current clinical evidence, as having possible limited benefit, no benefit or which may potentially cause harm to patients. An online survey tool was used to survey all FPM fellows and trainees inviting them to rank these recommendations and to provide any comment related to them. This engagement facilitated consensus and informed the Fellows and trainees about FPM’s involvement with the Choosing Wisely campaign.

FPM's final list of 5 Choosing Wisely recommendations reflects those that were the most broadly supported by the clinicians and which were considered to be the most relevant to community practice.

Recommendation 6
FPM Board directed that a poll of the fellowship be conducted to assess support for a sixth Choosing Wisely recommendation regarding the role of medicinal cannabis in chronic non-cancer pain treatment. The survey question was very similar to the final wording of the recommendation, and was supported by 79% of the fellows who responded (more than 25% of the active fellowship).

The final draft wording of the recommendation, explanation and list of key references was then approved by the Board and sent to Choosing Wisely for consideration by the Representative Panel. Feedback obtained from that consultation was then collated and discussed at the following Board meeting before some minor amendments were made to clarify the explanation section of the recommendation.


Download FPM Recommendations